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ofgeography:

queenlyanna:

Do you ever just get something and think: This. This is it. This is my new favourite thing.

 (via)

mydollyaviana:

Anastasia Trivia:The musical number "Paris Holds the Key (To Your Heart)" includes cameos by various historical characters from the time including Maurice Chevalier, Sigmund Freud, Charles A. Lindbergh, Josephine Baker, Claude Monet, Isadora Duncan, Auguste Rodin, and Gertrude Stein.
mydollyaviana:

Anastasia Trivia:The musical number "Paris Holds the Key (To Your Heart)" includes cameos by various historical characters from the time including Maurice Chevalier, Sigmund Freud, Charles A. Lindbergh, Josephine Baker, Claude Monet, Isadora Duncan, Auguste Rodin, and Gertrude Stein.
mydollyaviana:

Anastasia Trivia:The musical number "Paris Holds the Key (To Your Heart)" includes cameos by various historical characters from the time including Maurice Chevalier, Sigmund Freud, Charles A. Lindbergh, Josephine Baker, Claude Monet, Isadora Duncan, Auguste Rodin, and Gertrude Stein.
mydollyaviana:

Anastasia Trivia:The musical number "Paris Holds the Key (To Your Heart)" includes cameos by various historical characters from the time including Maurice Chevalier, Sigmund Freud, Charles A. Lindbergh, Josephine Baker, Claude Monet, Isadora Duncan, Auguste Rodin, and Gertrude Stein.
mydollyaviana:

Anastasia Trivia:The musical number "Paris Holds the Key (To Your Heart)" includes cameos by various historical characters from the time including Maurice Chevalier, Sigmund Freud, Charles A. Lindbergh, Josephine Baker, Claude Monet, Isadora Duncan, Auguste Rodin, and Gertrude Stein.
mydollyaviana:

Anastasia Trivia:The musical number "Paris Holds the Key (To Your Heart)" includes cameos by various historical characters from the time including Maurice Chevalier, Sigmund Freud, Charles A. Lindbergh, Josephine Baker, Claude Monet, Isadora Duncan, Auguste Rodin, and Gertrude Stein.
mydollyaviana:

Anastasia Trivia:The musical number "Paris Holds the Key (To Your Heart)" includes cameos by various historical characters from the time including Maurice Chevalier, Sigmund Freud, Charles A. Lindbergh, Josephine Baker, Claude Monet, Isadora Duncan, Auguste Rodin, and Gertrude Stein.
mydollyaviana:

Anastasia Trivia:The musical number "Paris Holds the Key (To Your Heart)" includes cameos by various historical characters from the time including Maurice Chevalier, Sigmund Freud, Charles A. Lindbergh, Josephine Baker, Claude Monet, Isadora Duncan, Auguste Rodin, and Gertrude Stein.

mydollyaviana:

Anastasia Trivia:The musical number "Paris Holds the Key (To Your Heart)" includes cameos by various historical characters from the time including Maurice Chevalier, Sigmund Freud, Charles A. Lindbergh, Josephine Baker, Claude Monet, Isadora Duncan, Auguste Rodin, and Gertrude Stein.

justrudeandginger:

souljannoying:

where does your first follower even come from

the friend that dragged you here in the first place

batman-mudafuka:

Cats are literally the cutest nerds ever
batman-mudafuka:

Cats are literally the cutest nerds ever
batman-mudafuka:

Cats are literally the cutest nerds ever
batman-mudafuka:

Cats are literally the cutest nerds ever
batman-mudafuka:

Cats are literally the cutest nerds ever
batman-mudafuka:

Cats are literally the cutest nerds ever
batman-mudafuka:

Cats are literally the cutest nerds ever
batman-mudafuka:

Cats are literally the cutest nerds ever
batman-mudafuka:

Cats are literally the cutest nerds ever
batman-mudafuka:

Cats are literally the cutest nerds ever

batman-mudafuka:

Cats are literally the cutest nerds ever

pinmeupagainstthesky:

These, for me, are the two most depressing paintings in western history. They were painted by post-impressionist Henry de Toulouse-Lautrec, a man who, due to inbreeding, was born with a genetic disorder that prevented his legs from growing after they were broken. After being so thoroughly mocked for is appearance, he became an alcoholic, which is what eventually caused his institutionalization and death. His only known romantic relations were with prostitutes.And then he paints something like this which is so beautiful and tender and sentimental. It seems like the couple in bed really loves each other—cares about each other. Wakes up happy to look at each other. And I see that love and passion and I wonder how lonely he must have been. I wonder how he could paint something like this without it breaking his heart. Maybe they say artists should create what they know, not because its unbelievable when they extend themselves beyond their experiences, but because when they pull it off with such elegance, it’s so damn unbearable to look at. I hate thinking of Lautrec, wondering about the lovers he created and knowing it was beyond his experience. Creating something that he knows is beautiful and knows he’ll never really understand. 
pinmeupagainstthesky:

These, for me, are the two most depressing paintings in western history. They were painted by post-impressionist Henry de Toulouse-Lautrec, a man who, due to inbreeding, was born with a genetic disorder that prevented his legs from growing after they were broken. After being so thoroughly mocked for is appearance, he became an alcoholic, which is what eventually caused his institutionalization and death. His only known romantic relations were with prostitutes.And then he paints something like this which is so beautiful and tender and sentimental. It seems like the couple in bed really loves each other—cares about each other. Wakes up happy to look at each other. And I see that love and passion and I wonder how lonely he must have been. I wonder how he could paint something like this without it breaking his heart. Maybe they say artists should create what they know, not because its unbelievable when they extend themselves beyond their experiences, but because when they pull it off with such elegance, it’s so damn unbearable to look at. I hate thinking of Lautrec, wondering about the lovers he created and knowing it was beyond his experience. Creating something that he knows is beautiful and knows he’ll never really understand. 

pinmeupagainstthesky:

These, for me, are the two most depressing paintings in western history. They were painted by post-impressionist Henry de Toulouse-Lautrec, a man who, due to inbreeding, was born with a genetic disorder that prevented his legs from growing after they were broken. After being so thoroughly mocked for is appearance, he became an alcoholic, which is what eventually caused his institutionalization and death. His only known romantic relations were with prostitutes.

And then he paints something like this which is so beautiful and tender and sentimental. It seems like the couple in bed really loves each other—cares about each other. Wakes up happy to look at each other. And I see that love and passion and I wonder how lonely he must have been. I wonder how he could paint something like this without it breaking his heart. 

Maybe they say artists should create what they know, not because its unbelievable when they extend themselves beyond their experiences, but because when they pull it off with such elegance, it’s so damn unbearable to look at. I hate thinking of Lautrec, wondering about the lovers he created and knowing it was beyond his experience. Creating something that he knows is beautiful and knows he’ll never really understand. 

curiousotaku:

Zankyou no Terror Opening
curiousotaku:

Zankyou no Terror Opening
curiousotaku:

Zankyou no Terror Opening
curiousotaku:

Zankyou no Terror Opening
curiousotaku:

Zankyou no Terror Opening
curiousotaku:

Zankyou no Terror Opening
curiousotaku:

Zankyou no Terror Opening
curiousotaku:

Zankyou no Terror Opening
curiousotaku:

Zankyou no Terror Opening
curiousotaku:

Zankyou no Terror Opening

curiousotaku:

Zankyou no Terror Opening

glassbottomairplane:

Cool ghost photography by surrealist photographer Cristopher McKenney.
glassbottomairplane:

Cool ghost photography by surrealist photographer Cristopher McKenney.
glassbottomairplane:

Cool ghost photography by surrealist photographer Cristopher McKenney.
glassbottomairplane:

Cool ghost photography by surrealist photographer Cristopher McKenney.
glassbottomairplane:

Cool ghost photography by surrealist photographer Cristopher McKenney.
glassbottomairplane:

Cool ghost photography by surrealist photographer Cristopher McKenney.
glassbottomairplane:

Cool ghost photography by surrealist photographer Cristopher McKenney.

glassbottomairplane:

Cool ghost photography by surrealist photographer Cristopher McKenney.


What you are talking about is desire - just brutal desire. The name of that rattle-trap streetcar that bangs through the Quarter, up one old narrow street and down another.

What you are talking about is desire - just brutal desire. The name of that rattle-trap streetcar that bangs through the Quarter, up one old narrow street and down another.

What you are talking about is desire - just brutal desire. The name of that rattle-trap streetcar that bangs through the Quarter, up one old narrow street and down another.

What you are talking about is desire - just brutal desire. The name of that rattle-trap streetcar that bangs through the Quarter, up one old narrow street and down another.

What you are talking about is desire - just brutal desire. The name of that rattle-trap streetcar that bangs through the Quarter, up one old narrow street and down another.

What you are talking about is desire - just brutal desire. The name of that rattle-trap streetcar that bangs through the Quarter, up one old narrow street and down another.

What you are talking about is desire - just brutal desire. The name of that rattle-trap streetcar that bangs through the Quarter, up one old narrow street and down another.

What you are talking about is desire - just brutal desire. The name of that rattle-trap streetcar that bangs through the Quarter, up one old narrow street and down another.

What you are talking about is desire - just brutal desire. The name of that rattle-trap streetcar that bangs through the Quarter, up one old narrow street and down another.

kgm42986:

izziesworldofizzie:

stagecoachjessi:

Classic Hollywood Bloopers

And the greatest Hollywood blooper of all time:


These are WONDERFUL
kgm42986:

izziesworldofizzie:

stagecoachjessi:

Classic Hollywood Bloopers

And the greatest Hollywood blooper of all time:


These are WONDERFUL
kgm42986:

izziesworldofizzie:

stagecoachjessi:

Classic Hollywood Bloopers

And the greatest Hollywood blooper of all time:


These are WONDERFUL
kgm42986:

izziesworldofizzie:

stagecoachjessi:

Classic Hollywood Bloopers

And the greatest Hollywood blooper of all time:


These are WONDERFUL
kgm42986:

izziesworldofizzie:

stagecoachjessi:

Classic Hollywood Bloopers

And the greatest Hollywood blooper of all time:


These are WONDERFUL
kgm42986:

izziesworldofizzie:

stagecoachjessi:

Classic Hollywood Bloopers

And the greatest Hollywood blooper of all time:


These are WONDERFUL
kgm42986:

izziesworldofizzie:

stagecoachjessi:

Classic Hollywood Bloopers

And the greatest Hollywood blooper of all time:


These are WONDERFUL
kgm42986:

izziesworldofizzie:

stagecoachjessi:

Classic Hollywood Bloopers

And the greatest Hollywood blooper of all time:


These are WONDERFUL
kgm42986:

izziesworldofizzie:

stagecoachjessi:

Classic Hollywood Bloopers

And the greatest Hollywood blooper of all time:


These are WONDERFUL
kgm42986:

izziesworldofizzie:

stagecoachjessi:

Classic Hollywood Bloopers

And the greatest Hollywood blooper of all time:


These are WONDERFUL

kgm42986:

izziesworldofizzie:

stagecoachjessi:

Classic Hollywood Bloopers

And the greatest Hollywood blooper of all time:

These are WONDERFUL


"Imagine; I used to have really long blonde hair, always wearing heels, lots of make-up. I had been someone who was highly feminised and had chosen to look that way, partly because I was 6ft 3in but also I was into that aesthetic. I knew it had to be stripped away. I knew this would be an important part, not just for my work but in terms of my own development, because I would be confronting elements of myself that I didn’t want to confront (…) To see yourself displayed as unattractive, large, masculine, it’s quite tough… But I know it’s just perspective. A social conditioning that causes us to view these traits in a woman in a negative way." — Gwendoline Christie

"Imagine; I used to have really long blonde hair, always wearing heels, lots of make-up. I had been someone who was highly feminised and had chosen to look that way, partly because I was 6ft 3in but also I was into that aesthetic. I knew it had to be stripped away. I knew this would be an important part, not just for my work but in terms of my own development, because I would be confronting elements of myself that I didn’t want to confront (…) To see yourself displayed as unattractive, large, masculine, it’s quite tough… But I know it’s just perspective. A social conditioning that causes us to view these traits in a woman in a negative way." — Gwendoline Christie

"Imagine; I used to have really long blonde hair, always wearing heels, lots of make-up. I had been someone who was highly feminised and had chosen to look that way, partly because I was 6ft 3in but also I was into that aesthetic. I knew it had to be stripped away. I knew this would be an important part, not just for my work but in terms of my own development, because I would be confronting elements of myself that I didn’t want to confront (…) To see yourself displayed as unattractive, large, masculine, it’s quite tough… But I know it’s just perspective. A social conditioning that causes us to view these traits in a woman in a negative way." — Gwendoline Christie

mjwatson-daily:

Amazing Spider-Man (Vol. 2) #54  Writer: J. Michael Straczynski, Pencils: John Romita, Jr.
mjwatson-daily:

Amazing Spider-Man (Vol. 2) #54  Writer: J. Michael Straczynski, Pencils: John Romita, Jr.
mjwatson-daily:

Amazing Spider-Man (Vol. 2) #54  Writer: J. Michael Straczynski, Pencils: John Romita, Jr.

mjwatson-daily:

Amazing Spider-Man (Vol. 2) #54 Writer: J. Michael Straczynski, Pencils: John Romita, Jr.